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Contents
Volume 2, Issue 2, November 2010

Table of Contents

Editorial

1) Exclusion from School and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.
Fintan O’Regan pp. 3 - 18
The exclusion of children from school, either on a fixed-term or a permanent basis, is a disciplinary tool used in primary and secondary schools throughout the United Kingdom. Students with special educational needs (SEN) are more likely to be permanently excluded than pupils without SEN (Department for Children, Schools and Families 2009). In this review paper, I will examine the role of underlying behavioural difficulties in school exclusion and specifically explore the potential role of ADHD in disruptive behaviours. Finally, with a view to initiating a discussion that emphasizes early recognition and proactive management of the causes of disruptive behaviour, I will use the evidence from this review to identify areas for further consideration. The over-arching intent of this effort is to encourage continued debate among all stakeholders in this important issue that impacts children’s potential and incurs a significant societal cost.
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2) Critical commentary on Fintan O’Regan’s paper Exclusion from School and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.
Richard Rose, Paul Bartolo, Lesley Hughes and Geoff Tennant pp. 19 - 29
Richard Rose (UK), Paul Bartolo (Malta), Lesley Hughes (UK) and Geoff Tennant (UK) give their varied responses to Fintan O’Regan’s paper Exclusion from School and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
 
A Response to Fintan O’Regan’s Exclusion from School and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (1)
Richard Rose pp. 19 - 22
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A Response to Fintan O’Regan’s Exclusion from School and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (2)
Paul Bartolo pp. 23 - 25
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A Response to Fintan O’Regan’s Exclusion from School and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (3)
Lesley Hughes pp. 26 - 27
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A Response to Fintan O’Regan’s Exclusion from School and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (4)
Geoff Tennant pp. 28 - 29
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3) The role of Trait Emotional Intelligence and social and emotional skills in students’ emotional and behavioural strengths and difficulties: A study of Greek adolescents’ perceptions.
Maria S. Poulou pp. 30 - 47
The emergence of the Trait Emotional Intelligence construct shifted the interest in personality research to the investigation of the effect of global personality characteristics on behaviour. A second body of research in applied settings, the Social and Emotional Learning movement, emphasized the cultivation of emotional and social skills for positive relationships in a school environment. In this paper we investigate the role of both personality traits and social and emotional skills, in the occurrence of emotional and behavioural strengths and difficulties, according to adolescent students’ self-perceptions. Five hundred and fifty-nine students from state secondary schools in Greece, aged 12-14 years old, completed The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Adolescent Short Form, The Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters, and The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. It was found that students with higher Trait Emotional Intelligence and stronger social and emotional skills were less likely to present emotional, conduct, hyperactivity and peer difficulties and more likely to present prosocial behaviour. Gender was a significant factor for emotional difficulties and grade for peer difficulties. The paper describes the underlying mechanisms of students’ emotional and behavioural strengths and difficulties, and provides practical implications for educators to improve the quality of students’ lives in schools.
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4) Reducing behaviour problems in young people through social competence programmes.
Knut K. Gundersen pp. 48 - 62
There is a relatively strong relationship between the concepts of behavioural problems and social competence, in that social competence is regarded as one of the most important protective factors in the prevention of behavioural problems. This paper argues that the concept of social competence should include social skills, social practice and empathic understanding. It identifies the components that form part of an effective social competence programme, including enhancing an understanding of social situations, increasing the generation of adequate social skills, improving the management of provocations which may lead to uncontrolled anger, and developing empathic understanding. The evidence also suggests that effective social competence programmes for children and young people should be multi modal and consist of mixed groups of pupils with and without difficulties. The paper concludes with a brief description of Aggression Replacement Training as an example of a programme which follows the recommended guidelines.
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Book Reviews

Special Edition - Call for Papers
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